Vodafone Qatar to promote digital literacy among parents

 15 Mar 2016 - 2:02

 

 

Doha: Vodafone Qatar is organising a Treasure Hunt at Ezdan Mall from Thursday to Saturday to inform parents about how to keep their children safe in the digital world and encourage them to have an open dialogue with the kids on these matters. 
The treasure hunt involves puzzles about the digital world parents need to solve with their children to win prizes. 
It is part of AmanTECH, Vodafone’s aid programme for online child safety. Launched in May 2014, AmanTECH, which stands for ‘safe tech world;, aims to promote digital literacy among parents and improve children’s digital safety. 
Mohamed Al Sadah, Chief Operating Officer, Vodafone Qatar, said: “Vodafone relies on its years of experience helping parents keep their children safe. 
“We have understood the local context and coupled that with our international track record to bring about a programme in Qatar we believe will make a difference. We aim to empower parents and help them equip their children with the right tools and understanding to navigate the digital world safely and take full advantage of its benefits. 
“We are committed to making AmanTech a long-term programme that will touch many people in Qatar, especially parents and our children and youth.” 
This year, AmanTech will reach out to parents and children aged 5-17. It will adopt a three-pronged approach with a focus on awareness, education and technical support. This will entail school parental workshops during the year, an online source for information and tips for parents [www.vodafone.qa/AmanTECH], online magazines, in addition to digital parenting guide available in stores and online.
Dana Haidan, Head, Corporate Social Responsibility, Vodafone Qatar, said: “What parents are looking for today is a one-stop shop which will tell them everything they need to know about the safety of their children such as choosing safety controls, mobile controls, limiting screen-time, choosing social networks, dealing with cyberbullying, self-harm, liaising with schools and the list goes on. With AmanTech, parents now have reliable sources to do that.”  As the digital world becomes more portable, it is becoming harder for parents to know what their children are up to online. Nearly half of Qatari children aged 8-15 own a smartphone and 76 percent of children aged 9-16 have a social network profile. The average Qatari 9-16-year-old spends over three hours a day on the Internet.
Haidan said: “This is a considerable amount of time spent by people of different age groups online. While technologies are changing and evolving, some uses — especially those of children — are somehow still the same. For example, children remain highly involved in gaming. It is crucial that we ensure youth are surrounded with a healthy technology-driven atmosphere and that we don’t miss out on the extraordinary benefits of this revolutionary era in human communications.” The Peninsula

 

 

Doha: Vodafone Qatar is organising a Treasure Hunt at Ezdan Mall from Thursday to Saturday to inform parents about how to keep their children safe in the digital world and encourage them to have an open dialogue with the kids on these matters. 
The treasure hunt involves puzzles about the digital world parents need to solve with their children to win prizes. 
It is part of AmanTECH, Vodafone’s aid programme for online child safety. Launched in May 2014, AmanTECH, which stands for ‘safe tech world;, aims to promote digital literacy among parents and improve children’s digital safety. 
Mohamed Al Sadah, Chief Operating Officer, Vodafone Qatar, said: “Vodafone relies on its years of experience helping parents keep their children safe. 
“We have understood the local context and coupled that with our international track record to bring about a programme in Qatar we believe will make a difference. We aim to empower parents and help them equip their children with the right tools and understanding to navigate the digital world safely and take full advantage of its benefits. 
“We are committed to making AmanTech a long-term programme that will touch many people in Qatar, especially parents and our children and youth.” 
This year, AmanTech will reach out to parents and children aged 5-17. It will adopt a three-pronged approach with a focus on awareness, education and technical support. This will entail school parental workshops during the year, an online source for information and tips for parents [www.vodafone.qa/AmanTECH], online magazines, in addition to digital parenting guide available in stores and online.
Dana Haidan, Head, Corporate Social Responsibility, Vodafone Qatar, said: “What parents are looking for today is a one-stop shop which will tell them everything they need to know about the safety of their children such as choosing safety controls, mobile controls, limiting screen-time, choosing social networks, dealing with cyberbullying, self-harm, liaising with schools and the list goes on. With AmanTech, parents now have reliable sources to do that.”  As the digital world becomes more portable, it is becoming harder for parents to know what their children are up to online. Nearly half of Qatari children aged 8-15 own a smartphone and 76 percent of children aged 9-16 have a social network profile. The average Qatari 9-16-year-old spends over three hours a day on the Internet.
Haidan said: “This is a considerable amount of time spent by people of different age groups online. While technologies are changing and evolving, some uses — especially those of children — are somehow still the same. For example, children remain highly involved in gaming. It is crucial that we ensure youth are surrounded with a healthy technology-driven atmosphere and that we don’t miss out on the extraordinary benefits of this revolutionary era in human communications.” The Peninsula