Doctors complete UK-assisted ultrasound course

June 15, 2014 - 5:01:36 am
HITC Director Dr Khalid Abdulnoor Saifeldeen, and Chief of Emergency Medicine at HMC Professor Peter Cameron with course participants. 

DOHA: Hamad International Training Center (HITC), a training facility run by Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), recently concluded a training course in ultrasound techniques for non-radiology doctors.

The course was organised in conjunction with the College of Emergency Medicine in the United Kingdom (UK CEM).

The HITC and UK CEM ultrasound course is one of a very few ongoing ultrasound courses of its type anywhere in the world. It is the only ‘bedside ultrasound’ course taught in the region with clinical governance and patient safety as the central theme, with essential emphasis on training standards and collaboration between emergency medicine and radiology.

Dr Khalid Abdulnoor Saifeldeen, HITC Director said, “HITC offers numerous courses aimed at continuously improving the efficiency and competence of HMC’s healthcare professionals, in line with the organization’s values and objectives of providing safe and high quality healthcare services in a patient-centered environment.”

Professor Peter Cameron, Chief of Emergency Medicine at HMC said, “This course is an essential requirement in ensuring that we train our emergency physicians to maintain high quality skills and clinically-governed practices. This course also brings four different entities together including the Hamad International Training Centre, Emergency Medicine, UK College of Emergency Medicine and Radiology Department. This maximises the resources available to our doctors so we can provide our patients with the safest and most effective care.”

Dr Lubna Andraous, a senior specialist in the Emergency Department, who completed the level two training of the ultrasound course said, “The course was great and the instructors were very helpful. The skills that we learnt through this course will definitely help us improve our services for the patients, especially for critically ill patients who are unstable. Through this training, we are now fully qualified to perform an ultrasound by the bedside of the patient to detect life threatening emergencies. This could help us to save lives.”

“A few weeks ago, I had a 50-year-old female patient who was complaining of a stomach ache, but soon went into cardiac arrest. I used the ultrasound technique taught in this course and found a life threatening condition which was obstructing her lungs. We were able to administer the required medication to her in time and it was the ultrasound detection that saved her life,” she added.

HITC offers around 1,000 courses in various medical disciplines annually, 30 of which are aimed at improving physicians’ efficiency.

The Peninsula

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