Heed truce, S Sudan leaders told

 14 May 2014 - 4:34

ADDIS ABABA: Mediators who brokered South Sudan’s fragile ceasefire called yesterday for the warring sides to abide by the deal, with bloodshed showing no sign of stopping despite promises made on paper.
“The parties should and must negotiate, and bring the fighting to an end,” said Seyoum Mesfin, head mediator from the East African regional bloc IGAD.
Fighting broke out soon after dawn on Sunday, a day after the ceasefire was signed by President Salva Kiir and rebel chief Riek Machar, the second time in the five-month conflict that a truce has failed to stick.
Both sides have blamed each other for launching ground attacks and artillery barrages, with the army yesterday reporting rebels bombarding their positions at Dolieb, just south of the war-ravaged town of Malakal.
“It is another serious violation of the agreement,” army spokesman Philip Aguer told AFP, insisting government troops were “holding positions but not returning fire.”
“All... must play their role and achieve a political solution,” Seyoum told reporters in the Ethiopian capital, where dragging peace talks have made little if any progress to end a conflict that has sparked warnings of famine and genocide.
UN refugee agency spokeswoman Fatoumata Lejeune-Kaba said over 1,000 refugees were continuing to cross into Ethiopia every day, many arriving after days of trekking “famished, exhausted and malnourished”.
Pagan Amum, former secretary general of the ruling party, who was arrested and put on trial for treason before being released as part of a peace gesture by Kiir, called on both sides to abide by the deal.
AFP

 

ADDIS ABABA: Mediators who brokered South Sudan’s fragile ceasefire called yesterday for the warring sides to abide by the deal, with bloodshed showing no sign of stopping despite promises made on paper.
“The parties should and must negotiate, and bring the fighting to an end,” said Seyoum Mesfin, head mediator from the East African regional bloc IGAD.
Fighting broke out soon after dawn on Sunday, a day after the ceasefire was signed by President Salva Kiir and rebel chief Riek Machar, the second time in the five-month conflict that a truce has failed to stick.
Both sides have blamed each other for launching ground attacks and artillery barrages, with the army yesterday reporting rebels bombarding their positions at Dolieb, just south of the war-ravaged town of Malakal.
“It is another serious violation of the agreement,” army spokesman Philip Aguer told AFP, insisting government troops were “holding positions but not returning fire.”
“All... must play their role and achieve a political solution,” Seyoum told reporters in the Ethiopian capital, where dragging peace talks have made little if any progress to end a conflict that has sparked warnings of famine and genocide.
UN refugee agency spokeswoman Fatoumata Lejeune-Kaba said over 1,000 refugees were continuing to cross into Ethiopia every day, many arriving after days of trekking “famished, exhausted and malnourished”.
Pagan Amum, former secretary general of the ruling party, who was arrested and put on trial for treason before being released as part of a peace gesture by Kiir, called on both sides to abide by the deal.
AFP