‘Travelling Through Arts and Times’ expo opens with rare exhibits

March 14, 2014 - 4:36:16 am

The Minister of Culture, Arts and Heritage H E Dr Hamad bin Abdulaziz Al Kuwari and Sheikh Faisal bin Qassim Al Thani  jointly opening the exhibition in the presence of Sheikh Mohammad bin Faisal Al Thani, senior members of the military, ambassadors and diplomatic representatives and leaders of business and academia.

DOHA: A set of Qatari gold jewellery and rare Islamic coins are among exhibits for the first time at the ‘Travelling Through Arts and Times’ exhibition, which opened yesterday at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar (CMUQ).

The expo, marking CMUQ’s 10th anniversary, features more than 160 rare artefacts from Sheikh Faisal bin Qassim Al Thani’s private collection, including a seven-metre-long wooden model pearl fishing boat and four vintage cars.



The Minister of Culture, Arts and Heritage H E Dr Hamad bin Abdulaziz Al Kuwari and Sheikh Faisal opened the expo in the presence of Sheikh Mohammad bin Faisal Al Thani, top army officers, ambassadors,  diplomatic representatives, CMU Associate Dean Patrick Sileo and Assistant Dean of Government Initiatives and Corporate Affairs Fadhel Annan, business leaders and academia. The expo until March 27 is showcasing the richness of Qatari and Islamic culture, heritage and civilisation in three sections. 

The ‘Aspects of Qatari heritage’ section highlights an ornate set of solid gold jewellery — a necklace, belt, earrings and bracelets  —from the 1920s, which was locally made and belonged to a Qatari noble woman. The set is part of Sheikh Faisal’s  private collection and on display for the first time.

And the wooden model of a jalbut – the most common type of pearl fishing vessel in Qatari waters, was commissioned by a Sheikha and at half-real size is one of its kind.

The ‘Islamic Art Collection’ features 64 ceramic and metal objects, carpets and Islamic coins, all dating from the very early Islamic period of 7th century to the early 20th century and which have never been publicly displayed before. A mid-7th century gold dinar coin with three standing imperial figures — the Byzantine emperor Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraklonas — is a highlight of the collection. 

The ‘Manuscripts: Reflecting the Past, illuminating the Future’, features items from the Arab and Islamic world, including religious manuscripts and those on science, philosophy and spiritual matters. There is a complete 18th century Sufi work by Al Asharani entitled Albaher Almawroud, which is extremely advanced for its time in terms of the paper used and elegant calligraphy. The four cars — a 1939 Studebaker Champion, a 1939 Ford, a 1947 Cadillac convertible and a Ford Crown Victoria, 1955-56 — are on show in front of the entrance to CMUQ’s main building. The Peninsula

 

comments powered by Disqus