Carnegie Mellon welcomes more women students

April 15, 2012 - 4:01:13 am

 

Ilker Baybars speaks during OurCS Qatar 2012 conference.

DOHA: With Qataris comprising approximately 40 percent of the recent incoming class at the Carnegie Mellon University- Qatar, the institute is well positioned to help Qatar’s woman population nurture their interests in science and technology.

“At Carnegie Mellon, we are working very hard to bring more women into computer science and information systems.  And in doing so, we aspire to see Qatar’s female population as contributors to Qatar National Vision 2030,” said Ilker Baybars, Dean of Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar, at the ‘Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science’ (OurCS) Qatar 2012 conference.

Female high school students and undergraduates from universities in Qatar gathered at Carnegie Mellon for the ‘Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science’ (OurCS) Qatar 2012 conference.  The participants learned about the important role women can play in developing Qatar’s knowledge-based economy by contributing to research efforts in computer science and related fields.

The programme featured prominent female computer scientists, including keynote speaker Sihem Amer-Yahia, principal research scientist at Qatar Computing Research Institute and former senior scientist at Yahoo! Research.

Saturday’s OurCS Qatar conference not only encouraged women to enter the fields related to computer science, but also highlighted the opportunities, excitement, and impact they can have by participating in computer science research.

Elaborating on the event’s importance, Bernardine Dias, Associate Research Professor at Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Institute and OurCS Qatar organiser, said: “Women are obviously an important part of society, capable of contributing significantly to research efforts.  A diverse workforce across all sectors will be integral for Qatar to become a knowledge-based economy.” Fifty-two percent of Carnegie Mellon Qatar’s 335 undergraduates are female.

The Peninsula

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